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    SLP

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    Bilingual Speech Pathologist

    In this episode, I meet with Jada Augustine, MS CCC-SLP, the owner of Jada's Got Your Backpack and Beyond the Label. Jada's non-profit provides free speech and language services to children of Belize. Tune into this episode and learn about how healthcare providers can be more culturally responsive when treating these populations!

    https://www.youtube.com/live/Z3JKp9-eCAE?si=O6nAWh8ohSfWN5tR

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    SLP

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    Bilingual Speech Pathologist

    As we continue our discussion on suicide prevention for Black children and youth, we must consider the ways SLPs can prevent suicide for CLD students in youth. One crucial way to do this is to create a safe space for children of color. Here are some tips adapted from Online Psychology@Pepperdine:

    Regulate your own emotions. “Can you calmly talk about race?” We can help children feel calm and safe in our presence when we choose to regulate our own emotions about challenging topics.

    Put up posters that support inclusion. Representation matters! “Featuring imagery and ideas that promote inclusion can give students a sense of belonging and cue that they are welcome” (OnlinePsychology@Pepperdine, 2021).

    Create treatment plans that are inclusive of many identities: Introduce books written by authors of color. Use stories and assignments that highlight the histories of other cultures.

    Assign writing prompts or discussions that encourage reflections/emotional regulation: This is the bottom line! We want to encourage students to use their expressive language skills and express their emotions (e.g., “To not hold their emotions in”). SLPs can have students practice identifying and labeling their emotions either confidentially or with peers.

    Allow students to access a safe space: Find a location on your campus that helps the student feel safe or calm. This may be the classroom of a specific teacher they trust or a physical space like the library or counselors room.

    Encourage students to take a timeout. Sometimes our students simply need a breather. According to the article, “if students can self-identify when they’re feeling overwhelmed, they can leave and come back when they’re ready.”

    Establish an anonymous reporting system: Children are becoming more aware of microaggressions and overt racism at school and in other mainstream environments. Allow students to feel safe to report a racist incident and take it seriously through investigation. Do your best to ensure the student remains anonymous.

    Recruit the help of teachers of color: Educators have a powerful skill for connecting with the students we serve. As SLPs, we can ask for help from our colleagues who “reflect and affirm the identities of students.” This, in turn, helps promote kinship, confidence, and safety for students.

    Citation:

    Pepperdine University. (2021, April 13). Helping Children of Color Heal from Collective Trauma [web log]. https://onlinegrad.pepperdine.edu/blog/children-of-color-collective-trauma-recovery/#supporting.

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    SLP

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    Bilingual Speech Pathologist

    How can SLPs help children of color heal from collective trauma? "Collective trauma" explains the psychological distress experienced when a group or large community experience a shared trauma. This can be the psychological impact of watching protests and riots in response to police brutality cases like George Floyd, or other experiences like the ever-going water crises in Flint Michigan.

    Pepperdine University (2021) provides insights on how we can help children heal from collective trauma. This is necessary for SLPs so we can ensure the welfare of the people we services (ASHA Code of Ethics, 2023).

    You can see the article HERE: https://onlinegrad.pepperdine.edu/blog/children-of-color-collective-trauma-recovery/#supporting

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    SLP

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    Bilingual Speech Pathologist

    Black History Month begins next week! Here are some things to keep in mind for therapy materials:

    1. Do your research! Make sure the information you are educating your students/clients on is accurate and based on historical facts.

    2. Keep your intentions in mind - consider WHY it's important to teach students about Black history.

    3. Release the struggle - not all Black history is about slavery or the Civil Rights Movement. There's a lot to celebrate! Remind students about the celebratory aspects of Black culture.

    4. Support Black businesses! There's plenty of Black businesses on TPT and Boom Cards (such as myself) who sell treatment materials. Support them this month and year round.